Thursday, September 02, 2010

[Contest] IPad Owners! Got Shakespeare?

Earlier this year we were pleased to give away some copies of Shakespeare In Bits’ interactive Romeo and Juliet application, that time for the PC.
They then turned around and cranked out an iPad edition, which has been going very well for them (Apple has chosen to feature them multiple times).  To mark the Back to School season we’re offering 3 promotional codes for those who want to give it a try!
Rules
* This is specifically for the iPad version.  Don’t enter if you don’t have one, or know someone who you’ll be giving the code to.
* Contest runs between now and Tuesday, September 7.  I pick that day because my kids go back to school on Wednesday.
* Leave a comment on this post answering this question: What play would you like to see get the interactive iPad treatment next?
* I will need a way to contact you if you win, but I don’t expect people to include their email addresses in posts, so I’ll publicly post the chosen winners when the time comes.  It’s up to you to come back and look for your name.

Got that?  As always, blah blah blah, I have to write in here that I reserve the write to modify or extend the rules, or otherwise scrap this contest and start over, if any unforeseen circumstances would compromise the integrity and fairness for everybody involved.  Fair enough? I haven’t had to do that yet, though, but I always worry that I’ll leave a loophole that makes it possible for somebody to cheat.
Ok, go!

UPDATE Wednesday, September 8 :  I see new entries coming in, but I'm sorry, I have to abide by the rules that I set up - contest is over as of the end of day Tuesday. Winners will be announced as soon as I can connect up with the guy supplying me the prizes :).

4 comments:

csg said...

The next popular choice for teachers would be Midsummer (magic, comedy, trickery) or Macbeth (blood ghosts, good strong words)...

Personally, I'd like to see more resources for Comedy of Errors, Titus, and Winter's Tale.

But the point was to pick ONE, right? Got it: Richard III - it's a pretty interactive play, too, with a lot of asides to the audience, and is an exciting story with a lot of great lines.

Kathryn Anderson said...

I have to agree about A Midsummer Night's Dream, but also think Much Ado about Nothing or Twelfth Night might translate well into such an interactive application.

KLK said...

I think Hamlet would be a good popular choice.

Andrea said...

They are all great, but I think The Tempest would be a good one.