Wednesday, November 30, 2016

The Satirical Rogue Says That Old Men Have Grey Beards #NoShaveNovember

Well I didn't write a novel, but I can say I reached the end of No Shave November!  Sometimes it's nice to just set yourself a personal motivational reminder that I can actually set my mind to do something for 30 days (or in this case, not do something) and actually follow all the way through with it.  Maybe for next month I'll try taking the stairs every day? :)


Thinking about shaving it down into something Shakespeare style, but I've never managed to make that work in the past and I end up getting rid of it.  Droeshout style has almost no beard, while Chandos when you look close goes all the way up the jaw line, which isn't a great modern look either.  I guess we'll have to see!

Seriously, though, go check out No Shave November and maybe share some links or donate some money. If you already did, thanks!

Monday, November 21, 2016

Your Loss, Beatrice.

"Lord, I could not endure a husband with a
beard on his face: I had rather lie in the woollen. " - Beatrice, Much Ado About Nothing
Every year around this time I like to take part in "No Shave November," otherwise known as "Woohoo I don't have to shave for two weeks!" followed by "Oh my god is it December yet this itching is going to drive me crazy!"

Seriously, though, sometimes it's nice to have a cause and try to do something meaningful:
The goal of No-Shave November is to grow awareness by embracing our hair, which many cancer patients lose, and letting it grow wild and free. Donate the money you typically spend on shaving and grooming to educate about cancer prevention, save lives, and aid those fighting the battle.
If I count Facebook and Twitter I've potentially got over ten thousand people that might see this post.  Maybe some of you might find it a cause worth supporting.  I don't really register and create my own page and that sort of thing, because it's not really about me. If you're in a position to donate and would like to do so, that's awesome. If you're not, then maybe you can share this post so more people see it. There's lots of ways to help.

Thanks for your support!  I'll update again later in the month!


Thursday, November 17, 2016

Horatio's Big Moment

I may have mentioned that I did not, at all, like Horatio in Benedict Cumberbatch's Hamlet. It wasn't just the over the top hipster characterization. He just didn't ... do, anything.  He's a nonentity in almost all of the play.  When we see him in the unusual scene one he's little more than a messenger with something very important to say, who is dismissed by Hamlet before he gets to say it.  Later it almost seems like he's heading out of town, having given up Hamlet for dead.

Except for one scene.  Hamlet's back, he's relayed the ridiculous story of how he escaped the pirates, and Rosencrantz and Guildenstern Are No More.  This takes Horatio a second to piece together, or maybe it just takes him a second to work up the guts to say it, but:

HORATIO
So Guildenstern and Rosencrantz go to't.

HAMLET
Why, man, they did make love to this employment;
They are not near my conscience; their defeat
Does by their own insinuation grow:
'Tis dangerous when the baser nature comes
Between the pass and fell incensed points
Of mighty opposites.

HORATIO
Why, what a king is this!
He yells that last line at Hamlet.  I think it's the only time he raises his voice.  Took me by surprise, actually. But I liked the interpretation.  Hamlet is in the middle of justifying how he's left two "friends" to their death and that he doesn't think twice about it, and Horatio has to say, "LISTEN TO YOURSELF! Were you supposed to be king? Is this the kind of king you would have been?"

Bardfilm tells me that this line can be interpreted as meaning Claudius -- agreement with Hamlet, getting back to the original "It was them or me, Claudius is the one that sent me to my potential death" argument.  If that's the case, then at least in this production Horatio would still be just a sniveling toady.  Hamlet's told him that he killed two guys and doesn't care, and Horatio's all, "Yeah, screw them!  Claudius is the real bad guy here, not you! Let's go get a scone and an espresso, I want you to read my Nanowrimo entry..."

(P.S. I feel obliged to point out here, for those that do not have the text handy, that Rosencrantz and Guildenstern do NOT typically know that they are taking Hamlet to his murder.  I wonder if Hamlet knew that, if it would have given him pause?)